Trinity Guildhall

About Trinity

 

Trinity College London is an international exam board that has been providing assessments since 1877. With a rich heritage of academic rigour and a positive, supportive approach to assessment, we provide recognised and respected qualifications in a unique spectrum of communicative skills — from music, drama and arts activities to English language — at all levels. Each year over 600,000 candidates in over 60 countries take a Trinity assessment and our international network is growing fast.

 

Trinity exams and assessments are designed to help students progress. They inspire learners and mark their achievement at each stage of their development and at all levels of competence. Our exams focus on assessing skills and how effectively the candidates can apply what they have learnt, not just on knowledge for its own sake. We also encourage candidates to bring their own choices and interests into our exams — this motivates students and makes the assessment more relevant and enjoyable.

Trinity exams are internationally recognised and fully accredited by Ofqual (Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation) and other education authorities in many countries around the world.

 

All Trinity Grade exams in Drama subjects for individuals and pairs are accredited in England, Wales and Northern Ireland by Ofqual, WAG and CCEA respectively and also have recognition in a number of other countries.

 

Exams are categorised at three attainment levels which are benchmarked as follows to the Levels of the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland:

 

Foundation (Grades 1–3) — Level 1

Intermediate (Grades 4–5) — Level 2

Advanced (Grades 6–8) — Level 3

 

Grades 1–3 typically relate to work at a standard comparable to that done in the UK in primary schools and the initial years of secondary schools, depending on the learner.

 

Grades 4–5 typically relate to work at a standard comparable to that done in the UK in secondary schools by students aged approximately 12–15 in preparation for relevant GCSE exams.

 

Grades 6–8 typically relate to work at a standard comparable to that done in the UK in secondary schools by students aged approximately 15–18 working towards relevant A level exams in preparation for higher education study in the performing arts.

 

In the UK, solo and pair Grade exams accredited at Level 3 of the QCF carry points for university entry on the UCAS tariff system. While there are no minimum age limits imposed for entry at any grade, teachers should ensure that potential candidates have achieved an appropriate level of physical, vocal, emotional and intellectual maturity to meet the published learning outcomes and assessment criteria for the relevant attainment band prior to registration for exam.

 

While candidates may enter at any grade they choose, the syllabus is designed to provide a structured framework for progressive development of skills over time

 

Musical Theatre Exams Information

 

Grade 3 Group

Maximum 14 minutes

1. The performers:

EITHER briefly introduce themselves and the presentation (the examiner may ask one or two questions) OR provide an attractive written programme for the audience. (10%)

 

2. A presentation that includes acting, singing and dance/choreographed movement in approximately equal measure, either separately or simultaneously, performing from memory: EITHER a medley of pieces OR an extract/extracts from an original or published work. (90%)

 

Intermediate

Grade 4 Group

Maximum 16 minutes

1. The performers:

EITHER briefly introduce themselves and the presentation (the examiner may ask some questions) OR provide an attractive written programme for the audience. (10%)

 

2. A presentation that includes acting, singing and dance/choreographed movement in approximately equal measure, either separately or simultaneously, performing from memory: EITHER a fluent medley of pieces OR an extract/extracts from an original or published work. (90%)

 

Grade 5 Group

Maximum 18 minutes

1. The performers: EITHER briefly introduce themselves and the presentation and its theme (the examiner may ask some questions) OR provide an attractive written programme for the audience. (10%)

 

2. A presentation that includes acting, singing and dance/choreographed movement in approximately equal measure either separately or simultaneously, performing from memory: EITHER a programme of pieces related to a theme OR an extract/extracts from an original or published work. (90%)

 

Grade 6 Pair

Maximum 20 minutes

1) Performance from memory of three contrasting dramatic sequences that between them employ the integrated use of acting, singing and dance/choreographed movement.  The pieces are to be introduced by the candidates, focusing on content, context and roles to be played. (Approximately 15 minutes 80%)

 

2)  A discussion with the examiner on the preparation and interpretation of the performed pieces, each candidate making an equal contribution. This may include a brief improvisation arising from one of the performed pieces (the stimulus will be given by the examiner) or modification of one of the performed pieces. (20%)

 

Grade 7 Pair

Maximum 23 minutes

1. Performance from memory of a programme of four contrasting dramatic sequences that between them employ the integrated use of acting, singing and dance/choreographed movement. The programme must include material written both before and after 1965. The programme is to be introduced by the candidates, focusing on content, context and roles to be played. (Approximately 18 minutes 80%)

 

2. A discussion with the examiner on the preparation, style and interpretation of the performed pieces, each candidate making an equal contribution. This may include a brief improvisation arising from one of the performed pieces (the stimulus will be given by the examiner) or modification of one of the performed pieces. (20%)

 

Grade 8 Pair

Maximum 25 minutes

1. Performance from memory of a fluid, thematically linked programme of six contrasting dramatic sequences that between them employ the integrated use of acting, singing and dance/choreographed movement.

One of the sequences must be primarily a dance or movement piece. The rest of the programme must include the integrated use of acting, singing and dance/choreographed movement. The programme must include material written both before and after 1965. The programme is to be introduced by the candidates, focusing on content, context and roles to be played. (Approximately 20 minutes 80%)

 

2. A discussion with the examiner on the prepared pieces: their meaning, style, preparation, interpretation and context, each candidate making an equal contribution. This may include a brief improvisation arising from one of the performed pieces (the stimulus will be given by the examiner) or modification of one of the performed pieces. (20%)